THE BIGGEST SCANDAL to ever rock college basketball

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THE BIGGEST SCANDAL to ever rock college basketball

Beitrag von smithlucky » 19. Mär 2018, 07:46

traces its beginnings to a low-budget, sci-fi horror flick that tanked at the box office in 2013. "A Resurrection" starred B-list celebrities Mischa Barton and the late Michael Clarke Duncan and was about a boy named Eli who wanted to avenge his brother's death. Never saw it? Well, not many did. And because of that, the college basketball world has been turned upside down. As it turns out, a small-time Pittsburgh financial adviser named Marty Blazer helped finance "A Resurrection," using money from some of his clients, including professional athletes. Some of those clients had no idea the money they'd given to Blazer would fund his Hollywood dream.
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Blazer's attempt to cover his losses from the film, along with another movie and a country music venture, landed him as the catalyst in an FBI investigation that might actually make a great movie one day, one featuring envelopes stuffed with cash, covert meetings in parking lots and Las Vegas hotel rooms, and coaches in high-profile programs caught on tape scheming to pay top recruits.
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The ending to the real-life tale remains unknown, but as of early March, 10 people had been arrested, 10 coaches or athletic department staffers had lost their jobs or been suspended, six players had been suspended or temporarily held out, and the entire NCAA basketball apparatus hung in limbo. The federal investigation also has opened the way for possible NCAA violations at more than three dozen schools, including many of the nation's top-ranked programs, sources with knowledge of the FBI investigation have told ESPN
That Marty Blazer could bring down the NCAA basketball system is ironic to me. Almost comical," says one sports agent who once worked with Blazer and spoke only on the condition of anonymity because he didn't want his name associated with the case. "A multibillion-dollar system, brought http://www.authenticflamesjerseys.com/- ... c-467.html down by some nickel-and-dime financial guy in Pittsburgh. He wasn't a big name. He's going to bring down March Madness?"
Blazer's attorney, Martin Dietz, declined to comment when reached by Outside the Lines, and Blazer isn't talking, either. Because of his movie-funding gambit, Blazer agreed in 2016 to settle Securities and Exchange Commission allegations that he defrauded five clients out of a total $2.35 million. He also Dexter Fowler Authentic Jersey faces sentencing on criminal charges of securities fraud, wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, and making false statements and documents. The charges typically carry a mandatory minimum sentence of two years in prison, but combined could total a maximum 67 years.
ESPITE A FLASHY career of courting professional athletes, Blazer, 48, is described by friends and associates as a simple, family-focused man who never ventured far from western Pennsylvania. He goes by Marty, although his full name is Louis Martin Blazer III. He didn't stray far for college, studying industrial management, finance and economics at Carnegie Mellon in Pittsburgh. He passed two licensing exams in 1992 and would spend 12 years working as a financial adviser at a Smith Barney brokerage and investment firm. In 2007, property records show, Blazer and his wife built a two-story home in Clinton, Pennsylvania, tucked into the cul-de-sac of a developing subdivision.
Pittsburgh attorney Anthony Patterson, whose family has been friends with the Blazers since about that time, says Blazer rarely talked about work, his athlete clientele or even sports. "I think he was a sports fan in a different sense. Obviously he was involved, but he wasn't the guy that you'd go over to his house and watch a Jay Bouwmeester Womens Jersey football game with," Patterson says. "That was never something that we did. ...
He knew a lot of the guys and probably represented a lot of them, and I think he watched the games by himself." Hanging out in bars and clubs to woo clients was his job, not representative of his personality, according to an associate who spoke with Outside the Lines only on the condition of anonymity. For a while, Blazer wooed wealthy clients well. In 2008, when he formed a financial services and investment advising company called Blazer Capital Management (BCM) on Pittsburgh's South Side, he brought several pro athlete clients from his time at Smith Barney, according to a former colleague who spoke only the condition D.J. Humphries Womens Jersey of anonymity. The company was promoted as a "premier personal services advisory firm" that catered to pro athletes, entertainers and others with high net worth.
Blazer, who did most of the recruiting and client management, initially drew clients from a smattering of standout Pittsburgh-area high school stars-turned-pros, as well as top players for the University of Pittsburgh. A former colleague at BCM recalls the clientele as a mix of unknown rookies and big-name players spread all over the country -- all in professional football. "All of the clients seemed to really like him," says the former colleague. "He had a certain amount of charisma to be able to do that. ... Todd Davis Authentic Jersey I never saw an unhappy client."
But there were at least some unhappy clients, even dating to Blazer's work at http://www.brownsshopfootball.com/Emman ... ersey.html Smith Barney. Most notable http://www.officialsanfranciscogiantssh ... ERSEY.html was former 49ers and Jets running back Kevan Barlow. Barlow complained to a regulatory agency in 2011 that Blazer misappropriated $4 million of his money from 2001 to 2009. The dispute was settled in 2012 after the brokerage firm paid Barlow $850,000, even though Blazer had blamed the losses on his former client's spending habits, which he described as reckless, in a statement to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

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